Texas During Reconstruction

Texas During Reconstruction

There are few good things to be said of the North’s Reconstruction of the South. To illustrate the distress and victimization of the South after the War, I chose a quotation of Robert E. Lee. He had surrendered his army in hope of healing and peace for the South. Instead, the South received the punitive and wicked policies of Reconstruction. In August of 1870, Mr. Lee said to Governor Stockdale of Texas:

“Governor, if I had foreseen the use those people designed to make of their victory, there would have been no surrender at Appomattox Courthouse; no sir, not by me. Had I foreseen these results of subjugation, I would have preferred to die at Appomattox with my brave men, my sword in this right hand.”

Reconstruction was time of political and economic turmoil. It was also during Reconstruction that much of the violence that characterized our view of the West developed, even in our section of the State. Much research is available in which one can find many interesting outlaw vignettes.

For example, according to this site, “The Corners,” a was wild ticket located where four counties meet–Fannin, Grayson, Collin, and Hunt