A Review of Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend by Richard G. Williams Jr.

A Review of Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend by Richard G. Williams Jr.

In my research for my children’s picture book about the black Sunday school that Stonewall Jackson taught just before the War Between the States, the most helpful book I’ve found is Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man’s Friend by Richard G. Williams Jr. (Cumberland House Press). The book is thought provoking and reveals Williams’ extensive research–research that brings many surprising and ironic facts to light. The book is objectively written, well-documented, and is a book that not only humanizes Jackson, but also describes the complex relationship between black and white Americans before and during the Civil War. I had known Jackson was a spiritual man, but only after reading this book did I understand how deep his spirituality was. Williams, the author, reveals thorough understanding and knowledge of the scripture and religious history. By analyzing the time period and setting, Jackson’s family and life, the individuals who influenced Jackson, and the individuals he influenced, Williams opens the heart of Jackson and we not only see Jackson the soldier, but Jackson the Christian, the man who out of love for his fellow man risked fines, imprisonment, and ridicule because he wanted to share the gospel with people of color.

If you are a student of America’s Civil War, Williams’ book on Stonewall Jackson is a fine book to add to your collection. You can and should order his book here:

Here is a song, written by Jed Marum, one of America’s top Celtic and Civil War musicians, honoring Stonewall Jackson. If you enjoy or are interested in hearing great music of the Civil War, you need Jed’s CD, “Cross Over the River.” You can order it here:

CROSS OVER THE RIVER