Song Lyrics: “Till I’m Too Old to Die Young”

WRESTLING WITH THE SENSE OF MORTALITY

Losing my brother nearly two years ago and taking care of an aging and fading father has changed me. I am keenly aware of my own mortality, of this fragile existence and I see more clearly why “death and love” (in all their forms) are said to be the two great themes of art and literature. I think this song by Kevin Welch and Kieran Kane express my own thoughts. Though I remember hearing this song performed by someone else, when I saw Kieran Kane was performing, I bought the song listed under his name on iTunes. This site says the song version I heard was written by Kevin Welch, ?John Hadley, and ?Scott Dooley with Kevin Welch, vocal, guitar; ?Kieran Kane: octave mandolin; ?Fats Kaplin, button accordion. I quickly learned this song and intend to make it a part of my own Americana music show. I’ve almost got the words memorized already.

“Till I’m Too Old to Die Young”

If life is like a candle bright
Then death must be the wind
You know you can close your window tight
And it still comes blowing in
So I will climb the highest hill
And I’ll watch the rising sun
And I pray that I won’t feel the chill
Till I’m too old to die young

Chorus:
Let me watch my children grow
To see what they become
Lord don’t let that cold wind blow
Till I’m too old to die young

I have had some real good friends
I thought would never die
But now all that I got left of them
Are these teardrops in my eyes

So if I could have one wish today
And I know it would be done
I’d say everyone could stay
Till they’re too old too die young
Repeat chorus twice

UNIVERSITY NEWS:

Last night from 5:00-6:30, along with some of my Academic Seminar students, I attended the first night in an art series, The Art of the New. This is an eight part series that will be shown every Tuesday night from 5:15- 6:15 in Coenan Room 158 (on the Delta campus north of ULM and Starbucks), beginning February 3rd. The popular art history sequel to the BBC’s Civilization series, picks up at the threshold of the 20th century. It is written and presented by Robert Hughes, art critic and senior writer for Time.

Hughes draws on a wealth of documentary materials from the archives of the BBC, including rare footage and interviews with noted artists. The range of major figures includes Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, le Corbusier, Max Ernst, Francis Bacon and Jackson Pollock. The program is facilitated by Delta’s very talented art teacher, Stacy Medaries.