Hotel Thoughts in Mobile, Alabama

Tonight I’m in a Super 8 motel in Mobile, Alabama. Thankfully they have wireless that works. I left Monroe around 10 am, stopped at six different libraries promoting my book and arranging for future signings. I did get some sales out of it, but in some of the libraries the decision makers or directors weren’t there. I had hoped to visit ten, but after 5:00 pm there’s no need of stopping in usually. I’m tired, with more work to do tonight before I go to sleep. I’d also like to read some, and of course I need to write–work on a short story or my novel.

Tomorrow begins the National Convention of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. I’m expecting tons of sales and many future speaking/presentation appointments. If I can keep my expenses to a minimum–and I can–I expect to come out ahead. I’m flipping through one of the Mobile Bay tourist books in my hotel room. It says that Mobile Bay is the culinary capital of the Gulf Coast. There’s many homes and museums that look interesting. However, I know I’ll be working too hard to get to any. I guess I can come back and play another time. Tomorrow night and Thursday, I’ll be in the Radison Admiral Semmes Hotel downtown. According to their advertisement, this landmark hotel has 170 luxurious rooms and suites designed with Queen Anne and Chippendale-style furnishings. It’s within walking distance of the Battlefield Hotel where my vendor’s booth will be. Though it’s a little fancy for a struggling author like myself, I got a good price because of the conference, so the rooms cost only a little more than my Super 8 hotel tonight. I’m sure I’ll have another post describing my trip and Mobile as the Radison Admiral has wireless Internet also.

As I drove here, I finished listening to the twelve audio CD’s of Stephen King’s The Cell. I found it a haunting and engaging read. (I do count listening to a book as a read. Often, I pick up on things I would not have if I had just read it with my eyes). It made me think about the whole cell phone phenomenon. I recall watching a group of a dozen or so female students walking across the university one afternoon. All were talking on cell phones.