An Interview with Rod Espinosa–Illustrator for Ariel: Therapy Dog of the Rio Grande Valley

rod photo In this blog entry, I am posting a recent interview with Rod Espinosa, award winning artist and illustrator who was chosen by my publisher, Sarah Publishing, to illustrate my newest children’s book entitled, Ariel: Therapy Dog of the Rio Grande Valley. cheap albion silver You can see some information (including how to order it) about the book here:
1. What is the best website to go to for information about you and your work?
The best website right now is http://rodespinosa.deviantart.com The gallery is easily navigable and it includes most up to date pictures of my projects. I also post on Facebook under the name of Rod_Espinosa.
2. How long have you been a full-time artist? How many works have you produced?
I have been a full-time artist now for 15 years. When I first came down to San Antonio to work for Antarctic Press, I wore many hats. At some points, I was also the submissions editor, editor, driver (lots of driving), laborer and even janitor.
To date, I have written and illustrated over 30 comic book titles and illustrated over 42 children’s books (43 now, with Ariel the Therapy Dog). Some of the graphic novel titles I wrote and drew include “the Courageous Princess” (nominated for the Eisner awards), “Neotopia” (nominated for the Max und Moritz awards in Germany), Steampunk Fairy Tales, and my work with the UN program’s “Stop TB” series which features famous footballers teaching people how to avoid getting Tuberculosis and various other diseases. new balance 577 grey green orange (http://www.stoptb.org/global/people/ambassadors/figo/world_tb_cup.asp)
Oh, and I produced, developed and illustrated my very own boardgame “Adventure Kingdom”. That was a lot of fun, work and hardship! haha! (https://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/adventure-kingdom-starter-set) (https://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/adventure-kingdom)
3. buy albion silver When/how did you discover your interest in art? What was your first really big break?
Like most artists, I began very early. But I never envisioned being able to do art for a living. cheap albion gold I thought I’d be an Architect because that’s what kids who could draw usually entered into in college. Luckily, the field of Advertising came up just as I was entering college so that became a good option. Solde adidas zx flux It exposed me to all the possible media out there.
There wasn’t really a big break per se. It’s more like a series of small victories interspersed with some career drops. Even now, it’s still a challenge to finally “make it”. I guess we all have a definition of what it means to finally “make it”. I can support my folks in their old age and buy good food and pay the bills. nike homme kaki That’s about it. Don’t have a Lamborghini yet (though I’d love to have a Prius).
4. Though I know you have several artistic skills, I know you primarily as a digital artist? How is that different/similar from traditional art forms? What are the basic tools/programs needed for digital art? Do you see or can you predict any changes in the genre of digital art? How/where can a young artists get training in this art form? Are there any contests you